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Fraud Detection

EnFact Fraud Detection

Help us prevent fraud

To protect your bank account, FVSBank monitors debit card and ATM transactions for potentially fraudulent activity through a Fraud Detection Program called EnFact. Potentially fraudulent activity may include a sudden change in locale (such as when a U.S.-issued card is used unexpectedly overseas or in a foreign country), a sudden string of costly purchases, or any pattern associated with new fraud trends around the world.

If we suspect fraudulent ATM or debit card use, our monitoring agency will be calling you to validate the legitimacy of your suspect transactions.

You may be called

If fraudulent ATM or debit card use is suspected on your bank account, you will be called to validate the legitimacy of your transactions. Your participation in responding to our call is critical to prevent potential risk and avoid restrictions we may place on the use of your ATM or debit card.

  • Our automated call center will ask you to verify recent transaction activity on your card.
  • You’ll be asked to verify your identity and provide your 5-digit ZIP code.
  • You’ll be able to respond via your touchtone keypad.
  • You’ll also be provided a toll-free number to call should you have additional questions.

At FVSBank, our goal, quite simply, is to minimize your exposure to risk and the impact of any fraudulent activity on your bank accounts.

Protect yourself

1. Unless absolutely required for a legitimate business purpose, avoid giving out your:

  • Address and ZIP Code
  • Phone Number
  • Date of Birth
  • Social Security Number
  • ATM, Debit or Credit Card or Bank Account Number
  • ATM, Debit or Credit Card Expiration Date
  • Your PIN is private; NEVER give it out

2. In stores and at ATMs, always cover your bank card and PIN, and watch for:

  • Cell phone cameras, mirrors or other tools used to view cards and PINs
  • People watching your transactions
  • Cashiers taking your card out of sight; take it to the register yourself
  • Any unusual activity at ATMs; if you feel uncomfortable, go to another ATM
  • Any device or coverings on the card slots of ATMs; if you see this do not insert your card and go to another ATM 

3. Online, you should never respond to unsolicited emails that:

  • Ask you to verify your credit or debit card or bank account number; such emails are not sent by legitimate businesses
  • Links to websites; such sites can look legitimate but may collect data or put spyware on your computer

It is the policy of FVSBank to NEVER solicit customer information or identification, numbers or passwords, via email. If you are approached with such an offer, do not reply to the email and instead contact FVSBank immediately. For more information on how to protect your bank accounts, please contact your local Fox Valley Savings Bank location in Waupun, Fond du Lac or Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Free Annual Credit Report

At FVSBank, we understand how important it is for our clients to know and understand their credit score. Here, we’ve put together some information on how to get your free credit report and encourage you to access it annually.

To get your Free Credit Report

AnnualCreditReport.com is the ONLY authorized source for the free annual credit report that is yours by law. The Fair Credit Reporting Act guarantees you access to your free credit report every twelve months, from each of the three nationwide credit reporting companies — Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion.

The Federal Trade Commission has received complaints from consumers who thought they were ordering their free annual credit report, but were still required to pay fees or buy other services. In addition, TV ads, email offers, or online search results will often offer "free" credit reports, but Annual Credit Report is the only authorized source for a truly free credit report. 

Security Tips

Online banking is secure, as long as you carefully manage your personal information.

At FVSBank, we take security very seriously for our online banking customers. With every advance in security technology, criminals work to find a way around it. We're dedicated to keeping our banking customers as safe as possible. Contact your local FVSBank in Waupun, Fond du Lac or Oshkosh, Wisconsin for more information on how to keep your online banking information secure.

What to do if your online banking information has been stolen.

If you believe your online banking information is at risk, it's very important that you act quickly and do the following:

1. Cancel your credit cards immediately; the key is having the toll-free numbers and your card numbers handy.

2. File a Police Report. This proves to credit providers that you were diligent, and it is a first step toward an investigation if there is one.

3. Call the three national credit reporting organizations immediately to place a fraud alert on your name and Social Security Number. This alert means that any company that checks your credit knows your online banking information was stolen and they have to contact you by phone to authorize new credit.

  • Equifax: (800) 685-1111
  • Experian: (800) 682-7654
  • Trans Union: (800) 916-8800

4. Call your bank to report the incident. 

Unauthorized Activity

Protecting Your Bank Account

To protect you and your money, FVSBank is constantly monitoring our clients’ bank accounts for fraudulent, unauthorized activity.  During a recent security review, some of the Fox Valley Savings Bank Debit Cards were identified as being at risk for unauthorized charges. 

FVSBank is reaching out to our banking customers that may have experienced unauthorized charges on their Debit Card.  If you have received communication from us regarding this and still have questions, please contact us at 920-921-7220 (Fond du Lac), 920-231-1163 (Oshkosh), 920-324-5528 (Waupun) or via email at marketing@fvsbank.com.

In the meantime, protect your bank account even further by reviewing your activity and statements on the web, via online banking & bill pay.

Important: If you notice any unauthorized or suspicious activity on your bank account, please notify us immediately at 920-921-7220 (Fond du Lac), 920-231-1163 (Oshkosh) or 920-324-5528 (Waupun).

Identity Theft

Phishing, Scams & Identity Theft

Identity theft occurs when your personal information is stolen and used without your knowledge to commit fraud or other crimes. Identity theft is a serious crime that can cost you money and time, ruin your good name, and can even destroy your credit. 

What is identity theft? 

If you fall victim to ID theft, take these steps:

Identity theft protection and prevention begins with you.

To avoid being a victim, you can take a few precautionary steps. It is important to keep in mind that financial institutions will never call customers asking for account information. Never respond to emails or phone calls that warn of dire consequences unless you take action immediately. In addition, consumers and businesses need to pay extra attention as they go about their daily routine. Do not give credit card numbers, Social Security numbers or other personal identifying information to anyone over the phone or in an email unless you contact them first and know you are dealing with a legitimate company.

How to help prevent identity theft:

  • Protect your incoming and outgoing mail. Take outgoing mail to the post office.
  • Always shred documents with any personal identifying information.
  • Carry only the credit and ID cards that you actually use in your wallet. Limit your cards to one or two, your debit card and a few personal checks.
  • Do not carry your Social Security card in your wallet and do not place your number on your checks.
  • Place your ATM card, credit card, receipts and other banking information in a safe place.
  • Never leave your wallet unattended and only carry with you the credit card you plan to use.
  • If you become aware of anyone using your identity, immediately notify creditors, law enforcement authorities and the major credit bureaus.
  • Review your credit report at least once a year. Receive a free copy online or by calling 1-877-322-8228.
  • Opt out of receiving pre-approved credit card or insurance offers; call 1-888-567-8688.
  • Password-protect your information. Do not use the same password for more than one account and do not make it too simple.
  • For additional information on avoiding identity theft, please visit the FTC website. 

Phishing

Online fraud protection begins with you.

Phishing is a way of attempting to acquire information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication. This is considered Internet crime. Communications purporting to be from popular social web sites, auction sites, online payment processors or IT administrators are commonly used to lure the unsuspecting public. Phishing is typically carried out by email spoofing or instant messaging, and it often directs users to enter details at a fake website whose look and feel are almost identical to the legitimate one.

Smishing is a form of phishing but delivered through cell phone text messages. These messages ask for immediate attention and then provide a web site URL or a phone number that connects you to an automated voice response system. This then requires you to give personal information.

In many cases the smishing message will show the number that sent the message as “5000” instead of an actual phone number. When this happens the SMS message was sent via email to the cell phone and not sent from another cell phone. 

To report suspicious activity for Internet (phishing) or cell phones (smishing) crime, contact www.ic3.gov.

ID Theft Resources

Identity Theft Resources

ONGUARD ONLINE

Provides practical tips from the federal government and the technology industry to help you be on guard against Internet fraud, secure your computer and protect your personal information. 

OnGuardOnline.gov is the federal government’s website to help you be safe, secure and responsible online. The Federal Trade Commission manages OnGuardOnline.gov, in partnership with the federal agencies listed below. OnGuardOnline.gov is a partner in the Stop Think Connect campaign, led by the Department of Homeland Security, and part of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education, led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. 

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION

Provides information on identity theft, Internet fraud & safety, free credit reports and the Do Not Call Registry. 

The FTC, the nation's consumer protection agency, works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them. The FTC enters consumer complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.

INTERNET CRIME COMPLAINT CENTER

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) is an alliance between the National White Collar Crime Center and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. IC3’s mission is to address crime committed over the Internet. For victims of Internet crime, IC3 provides a convenient and easy way to alert authorities of a suspected violation. For law enforcement and regulatory agencies, IC3 offers a central repository for complaints related to Internet crime, uses the information to quantify patterns, and provides timely statistical data of current trends.

ANNUAL CREDIT REPORT.COM

AnnualCreditReport.com is a centralized service for consumers to request free annual credit reports. It was created by the three nationwide consumer credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion.

This service provides consumers with the secure means to request and obtain a free credit report once every 12 months from each of the three nationwide consumer credit reporting companies in accordance with the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACT Act).

ID Theft Prevention Tips

Identity theft protection and prevention begins with you.

To avoid being a victim, you can take a few precautionary steps. It is important to keep in mind that financial institutions will never call customers asking for account information. Never respond to emails or phone calls that warn of dire consequences unless you take action immediately. In addition, consumers and businesses need to pay extra attention as they go about their daily routine. Do not give credit card numbers, Social Security numbers or other personal identifying information to anyone over the phone or in an email unless you contact them first and know you are dealing with a legitimate company.

To help prevent identity theft:

  • Protect your incoming and outgoing mail. Take outgoing mail to the post office.
  • Always shred documents with any personal identifying information.
  • Carry only the credit and ID cards that you actually use in your wallet. Limit your cards to one or two, your debit card and a few personal checks.
  • Do not carry your Social Security card in your wallet and do not place your number on your checks.
  • Place your ATM card, credit card, receipts and other banking information in a safe place.
  • Never leave your wallet unattended and only carry with you the credit card you plan to use.
  • If you become aware of anyone using your identity, immediately notify creditors, law enforcement authorities and the major credit bureaus.
  • Review your credit report at least once a year. Receive a free copy online or by calling 1-877-322-8228.
  • Opt out of receiving pre-approved credit card or insurance offers; call 1-888-567-8688.
  • Password-protect your information. Do not use the same password for more than one account and do not make it too simple.

For additional information on avoiding identity theft, please visit the Federal Trade Commission website.

Avoid Scams

Debit Card Scam

Calls from FVSBank? Not us! FVSBank customers have reported receiving calls telling them that their MasterCard has been locked out. This is an automated call asking customers to enter in their MasterCard number, security code and expiration date to 'unlock' their MasterCard. THIS IS A SCAM. Keeping reading to learn more about the Debit Card Scam.

Learn More about Debit Card Scam

Fake Check Scam

No matter the circumstances, don't agree to deposit a check from a stranger and wire money back. If the check bounces, you'll owe the bank any money you withdrew. Keep reading to learn more about the Fake Check Scam.

Learn More on the Fake Check Scam

Family Emergency Scams

Scammers may pose as relatives or friends, calling or sending messages to urge you to wire money immediately. They’ll say they need cash to help with an emergency-like getting out of jail, paying a hospital bill, or needing to leave a foreign country. Their goal is to trick you into sending money before you realize it’s a scam. Keep reading to learn more about Family Emergency Scams.

Learn more about Family Emergency Scams

Secret Shopper Scam

When you see "work from your home" advertisements on online job boards and/or in the newspaper, be careful. With many of these postings, even filling out the application is a risk. If you are asked for personal information that identifies you, like you social security or driver's license number, or if the 'employer' wants to deposit money into your bank account as part of the job — DO NOT GIVE OUT YOUR PERSONAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION. Keep reading to learn more about Secret Shopper Scams.

Learn More about Shopper Scams

Telephone Scams

Protect yourself against telephone scams. Con artists love the telephone. If you’re retired, one of the biggest threats to your wallet could be that smooth voice on the phone. With all age groups, phone scams are growing. And so are consumer complaints. With retirees, scammers give more time and attention. Keep reading to learn more about Telephone Scams.

Learn More about Telephone Scams

Grandparents Scam

You get a call or an email unexpectedly from someone who claims to be a friend or relative. This often happens to grandparents with the caller claiming to be their grandson or granddaughter. The caller says there’s an emergency and asks you to send money immediately. But beware, there’s a good chance this is an imposter trying to steal your money! Follow these tips to avoid becoming a victim of fraud. Keep reading to learn more about Grandparents Scam.

Learn More about Grandparents Scam

Telemarketing Resale Scams

If a telemarketer calls you with a chance to make extra money by re-selling designer clothing, purses, or perfumes from your doorstep, it might seem like the ideal work-at-home situation. For scammers, it’s a great way to steal your money through a scam that’s a classic game of bait and switch. Keep reading to learn more about Telemarketing Resale Scams.

Learn More about Telemarketing Resale Scams

Tech Support Scams

In a recent twist, scam artists are using the phone to try to break into your computer. They call, claiming to be computer techs associates with well-known companies like Microsoft. They say that they’ve detected viruses other malware on your computer to trick you into giving them remote access or paying for software you don’t need. Keep reading to learn more about Tech Support Scams.

Learn More about Tech Support Scams

Scam Proof your Doorstep

Nowadays, you can encounter a scam artist just about anywhere — online, over the phone and even at your door. Here are a few ruses that might come a’ knocking, and tips to avoid getting taken. Keep reading to learn more about how to Scam Proof your Doorstep.

Learn About how to Scam Proof your Doorstep

Prize Scams

You’re just won $5,000! Or $5 million. Or maybe it’s a fabulous diamond ring, or luxury vacation? More likely, it’s a prize scam, and you’ll find the prize isn’t worth much — if you get a prize at all. Here’s one way to think about it: if you have to pay, it’s not a prize. Keep reading to learn more about Prize Scams.

Learn More about Prize Scams

Phone Scams

Every year, thousands of people lose money to telephone scams- from a few dollars to their life savings. Scammers will say anything to cheat people out of money. Some seem very friendly-calling you by your first name making small talk and asking about your family. They may claim to work for a company you trust, or they may send mail or place ads to convince you to call them. Keep reading to learn more about Phone Scams.

Learn More about Phone Scams

Phishing

When internet fraudsters impersonate a business to trick you into giving out your personal information, it’s called phishing. Don’t reply to email, text, or pop-up messages that ask for your personal or financial information. Don’t click on links within them either-even if the message seems to be from an organization you trust. It isn’t. Legitimate businesses don’t ask you to send sensitive information through insecure channels. Keep reading to learn more about Phishing. 

Learn More about Phishing

Mortgage Relief Scams

The possibility of losing your home to foreclosure can be terrifying. The reality that scam artists are preying on desperate homeowners is equally frightening. Many companies say they can get a change to your loan that will reduce your monthly mortgage payment or take other steps to save your home. Some claim that nearly all their customers get successful results and even offer a money-back guarantee. Others say they're affiliated with the government or your lender and still others promise the help of attorneys or real estate experts. Keep reading to learn more about Mortgage Relief Scams.

Learn More about Mortgage Relief Scams

Imposter Scams

Scammers may pose as people you know and trust, and then make desperate appeals for cash to deal with an emergency. Their goal is to trick you into sending money before you realize it’s a scam. Keep reading to learn more about Imposter Scams.

Learn More about Imposter Scams

How to Guard Against Common Scams That Target Seniors

Hundreds of thousands of older Americans are victims of financial fraud and theft every year. Some scammers call seniors posing as a representative from Medicare, their bank, the IRS or another business entity then request credit card details and other financial information. Keep reading to learn more about How to Guard Against Common Scams That Target Seniors.

Learn More about How to Guard Against Common Scams That Target Seniors

Government Imposter Scams

Scammers sometimes pretend to be government officials to get you to send them money. They might promise lottery winnings if you pay “taxes” or other fees, or they might threaten you with arrest or a lawsuit if you don’t pay a supposed debt. Regardless of their tactics, their goal is the same: to get you to send them money. Keep reading to learn more about Government Imposter Scams.

Learn More about Government Imposter Scams

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